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A portfolio on research degree supervision - other sections

The contents of the portfolio, as shown on the portfolio structure page in Table 1 are presented in an order useful for a reader or assessor. However from your point of view, having to produce the portfolio, they are most easily understood out of order, in the order shown in the side menu.

This page considers the remaining sections that were not considered in the previous pages. Being short to explain, they are considered together.

References / bibliography (Section 10 of Table 1)

Claims need to show evidence of appropriate reading. This can be referenced in whatever way is the norm for your discipline.

The remit or assignment for the portfolio (Section 2 of Table 1)

If your portfolio is for an award of some sort, assessors, particularly external examiners. need to know what remit or other instructions the portfolio is addressing. This remit or assignment should be copied onto the first page of the portfolio with nothing else on that page.

Cover page (Section 1 of Table 1)

The cover page may be designed in whatever way you see fit, but should include the title of the Programme, the title of the module, your name, your institution, your qualifications (eg BA Exeter, PhD Southampton) and the names of your tutors).

Reflection on the process of creating the portfolio (Section 5 of Table 1)

In addition to the reflection in the claims, there needs to be a reflection on how the creation of the portfolio has influenced your practice. This should be no longer than a page. Although it will be placed early on in your portfolio to orientate the reader or assessor, it will necessarily have to be produced last, once the rest of the portfolio is complete.

Contents list (Section 4 of Table 1

The contents list should follow standard practice and be placed immediately after the remit/assignment page.

© Pat Cryer


* 'Supervisor' is a shorthand for 'research degree supervisor', 'advisor' or 'tutor', and applies to varying extents for all research degrees: PhD, DPhil. MPhil, Prof Doc and even undergraduate and masters' projects. In some countries, notably the USA, a 'supervisor' is known as an 'advisor'.